Back to your local site:
 


Related sites

Knight Ridder Washington Bureau: Making sense of Washington and the world.


Journalism at New York University: The mother ship, where Jay is chair of the journalism faculty.



Knight Ridder bloggers
  • Dave Barry
  • Alan Bjerga
  • Ohioblog
  • Adam Smeltz
  • Tom Webb


  • Blogroll
  • Jay Rosen's PressThink
  • Convention Bloggers.com
  • RNC Bloggers.com
  • CNN's Convention Blog
  • Yahoo's Blog Roundup
  • Feedster's Politics Page
  • Technorati's Election Watch
  • The Tank's RNC Bloggers
  • Romenesko
  • CyberJournalist
  • Lost Remote
  • TV Newser
  • Hardball's Blog
  • Blogging of the President
  • Reason's convention blog
  • Tapped
  • Nat. Review's The Corner
  • The Command Post
  • Daily Kos
  • Campaign Desk
  • Scripting News
  • Roger L. Simon
  • Matt Welch
  • KausFiles
  • ABC's The Note
  • Real Clear Politics
  • Campaign Web Review
  • Tacitus
  • Power Line
  • Talking Points Memo
  • Hugh Hewitt
  • Blogs for Bush
  • OxBlog
  • Talk Left
  • Political Wire
  • Glenn Reynolds: Instapundit
  • Jeff Jarvis: Buzzmachine
  • Atrios
  • Talking Points Memo
  • Betsy's Page
  • twistedchick
  • RNC convention home
  • CounterConvention.org
  • Knight Ridder RNC blogs




  • Sky Box by Jay Rosen



    A blogger's view of the convention and the press


    Friday, August 27, 2004

    "None of us knows what this is going to turn into. By everyone's hope, it won't be Chicago 1968." 

    A general sense of foreboding has emerged among prominent political TV reporters who are bracing for the hottest political convention since 1968. --Newsday report, Aug. 26.
    A couple of reminders this week of just how politicized the territory has become around the major media. There's a rise in tensions as we get closer to the convention countdown in New York.

    On Tuesday (Aug. 24) TV Newser reported that the area around Fox News Headquarters in New York City had received concrete fortifications.
    Security concerns have led Rockefeller Center to position fixtures outside Fox News headquarters ahead of the GOP convention. "About 12 large round concrete fixtures doubling as oversized flower pots were positioned in front of the Fox News studios on 6th Avenue" recently, an e-mailer says. "These are obviously positioned to prevent any vehicles from the street to jump the sidewalk and get close to the building."
    Fox News is one of the sites around New York City where a prudent police force might expect trouble-- because of what it stands for, and in alignment with. Media sites are political sites, especially in Fox's case, which means there's a potential for violence but also for political expression.

    That's what the oversized flower pots in front of Fox News are saying: Harden the perimeter. We may see "activity" around the building.

    Meanwhile the city is expecting there to be protest all over, but no one knows what to expect when it comes to big marches and other street demonstrations. So imagination is free to operate. The New York Observer's Joe Hagan reports this week that for TV news organizations, the main concern is not how to cover all the possible protests around town. It's "inciting disruptive behavior by showing up with cameras."

    The people who run network television don't want to be "causing" street politics in New York City. They are willing to take stealth action to avoid it.
    "The fear is that the presence of that causes it," said David Bohrman, the executive producer of CNN's convention coverage. "That's really a fear. We're reluctant to pull our cameras out if there's a crowd of people. You don't want to galvanize a crowd by pointing a camera at them. You want to report on them, but you don't want to be the cause of them."

    Mr. Bohrman said that was one of the reasons that most national news organizations didn't mark their equipment with logos.

    "I think you'll find the networks and the cable networks, their cars won't be marked so they don't attract attention..."
    Fortifications in front of Fox. Unmarked cars for network news crews. And a strange kind of dialogue going on between protestors in their rumored descent on the city and TV execs trying to war game it: Could we possibly have "democracy is in the streets" again, where TV, confronted with news on two fronts, cross cuts from one to the other-- from the convention, to the streets?

    Does that even happen at conventions any more? Do the rules permit it? Didn't we outgrow that? Hagen reports on the confusion sown by not wanting to be a cause:
    It wasn't clear what would constitute a news event big enough to cut into a prime-time Republican speech-- especially President Bush's. And nobody was willing to hazard a guess, for fear of inadvertently making a recommendation to the protesters.
    Fear of vehicle attacks. Fear of causing street action. Fear of protestors who somehow figure you out better than you have figured on them. Fear of '68. Fear of having to make a decision. They're all related.

    "We need to think a little bit before we do that," says David Bohrman, in charge of CNN's convention coverage. "None of us knows what this is going to turn into. By everyone's hope, it won't be Chicago 1968."


    Greg Mitchell, Editor & Publisher, Challenging a Media Myth: '68 Riots Didn't Doom Humphrey. (Aug. 27, 2004)





    Jay Rosen

    Jay Rosen is a press critic and writer whose primary focus is the media's role in a democracy. He is blogging the GOP convention for Knight Ridder. He can be reached at


     Latest posts

       •  A New Crowd of Convention Bloggers Weighs In
       •  The Convention in Section View
       •  Welcome to Sky Box (and Why Are We Calling it That...


     Archives
       •  August 2004
       •  September 2004

    XML-RSS feed










    About Realcities Network | About Knight Ridder | Terms of Use & Privacy Statement

    Copyright 2004 Knight Ridder. All rights reserved. Any copying, redistribution or retransmission of any
    of the contents of this service without the express written consent of Knight Ridder is expressly prohibited.